Tagged voter registration

Voter registration problems in Maryland signal larger vulnerabilities for upcoming elections

Binary data disappears in a dark hole

Voter registration data lost in Maryland

This Monday, state officials in Maryland acknowledged that problems with their “motor voter” systems are more significant than originally described:

[A]s many as 80,000 voters — nearly quadruple the original estimate — will have to file provisional ballots Tuesday because the state Motor Vehicle Administration failed to transmit updated voter information to the state Board of Elections.

— Up to 80,000 Maryland voters will have to file provisional ballots, state says (Washington Post. 6/25/18)

This announcement, made only hours before the polls opened for Maryland’s Tuesday primary, will mean more than just a minor inconvenience for the tens of thousands of voters affected. Sen. Joan Carter Conway (D-Baltimore City), chairwoman of the Senate Education, Health and Environment Committee, said that this situation will “confuse voters, suppress turnout, and disenfranchise thousands of Marylanders.”

Yet the significance of this programming error is broader still. Sen. Richard S. Madaleno Jr. (D-Montgomery), who is also running for governor of Maryland, called the incorrect registration of thousands of voters a “catastrophic failure.” In his statement, he continued, “The chaos being created by this failure subjects real harm to our most cherished democratic values,”

Is this election season hyperbole? Not at all, says John Sebes, Chief Technology Officer of the OSET Institute (the organization that runs the Trust The Vote project). In his recent article, Maryland Voter Registration Glitch: A Teachable Snafu, Mr. Sebes identifies the wide-ranging problems that will follow from these kind of disruptions at a larger scale:

If a foreign adversary can use cyber-operations to maliciously create a similar situation at large scale, then they can be sure of preventing many voters from casting a ballot.  With that disruption, the adversary can fuel information operations to discredit the election because of the large number of voters obstructed.

— John Sebes, OSET Institute

It is, in fact, the credibility of the entire election itself that is at stake. These kinds of technical problems don’t need to be the result of nefarious interference in the election process. Mr. Sebes continues,

The alleged system failure (hack, glitch, or whatever) doesn’t even need to be true!  If this accidental glitch had occurred a couple of days before the November election, and came on the heels of considerable conversation and media coverage about election hacking, rigging, or tampering then it would be an ideal opportunity for a claimed cyber-attack as the cause, with adversaries owning the disruptive effects and using information operations to the same effect as if it were an actual attack.

—  Maryland Voter Registration Glitch: A Teachable Snafu by John Sebes

Maryland is clearly vulnerable to this kind of attack on the credibility of their electoral process. Already, some are sounding the alarm that these voter registration problems weren’t identified quickly — plus, there’s no way to verify the process itself:

Damon Effingham, acting director of the Maryland chapter of Common Cause, said it was “preposterous” that it took MVA officials four days to figure out the extent of the problem and that there is no system to ensure that its system is working properly.

— Up to 80,000 Maryland voters will have to file provisional ballots, state says (Washington Post. 6/25/18)

What’s the solution?

John Sebes and the Trust The Vote project have spent years developing open source election software and systems to address these issues. But that alone isn’t sufficient. Mr. Sebes identifies the steps that election officials can take now to prevent the kind of problems that Maryland is experiencing this week:

  • “It’s partly a technology effort to re-engineer election systems to be less fragile from errors and less vulnerable to attack.”
  • “How to ensure the correctness and integrity of poll books[?] … that depends on emerging open data standards and the question of certification of poll books.”
  • “Given the great importance of public credibility … election officials must also plan for proactive public communication.”

Mr. Sebes concludes:

The Maryland glitch is not so much about failed integration of disparate data systems, but much more about unintentional catalyzing of opportunities to mount “credibility attacks” on elections and the need for a different kind of preparation.

Read the full article, Maryland Voter Registration Glitch: A Teachable Snafu by John Sebes, on the OSET Institute website.

The OSET Institute runs the TrustTheVote Project, a real alternative to nearly obsolete, proprietary voting technology. TrustTheVote is building an open, adaptable, flexible, full-featured and innovative elections operating system called ElectOS. It supports all aspects of elections administration and voting including creating, marking, casting, and counting ballots, as well as managing all back-office functions. Check out this overview of the TrustTheVote Project to learn more. If you’re involved in the election process, as an election official, or an academic or researcher, join the TrustTheVote Project as a stakeholder to help develop and deploy open, secure, reliable, and credible election technologies. If you’re concerned about the health of our election systems, you can donate or volunteer. If you have any questions about the TrustTheVote Project, contact us today.

NBC News, Voting Machines, and a Grandmother’s PC

 

I’d like to explain more precisely what I meant by “your grandmother’s PC” in the NBC TV Bay Area’s report on election technology. Several people thought I was referring to voting machines as easily hacked by anyone with physical access, because despite appearances:

Voting machines are like regular old PCs inside, and like any old PC …

  • … it will be happy to run any program you tell it to, where:
  • “You” is anyone that can touch the computer, even briefly, and
  • “Program” is anything at all, including malicious software specially created to compromise the voting machine.

That’s all true, of course, as many of us have seen recently in cute yet fear mongering little videos about how to “hack an election.” However, I was referring to something different and probably more important: a regular old PC running some pretty basic windows-XP application software, that an election official installed on the PC in the ordinary way, and uses in the same way as anything else.

That’s your “grandmother’s PC,” or in my son’s case, something old and clunky that looks a exactly like the PC that his grandfather had a decade plus ago – minus some hardware upgrades and software patches that were great for my father, but for voting systems are illegal.

But why is that PC “super important”? Because the software in question is the brains behind every one of that fleet of voting machines, a one stop shop to hack all the voting machines, or just fiddle vote totals after all those carefully and securely operated voting machines come home from the polling places. It’s an “election management system” (EMS) that election officials use to create the data that tells the voting machines what to do, and to combine the vote tally data into the actual election results.

That’s super important.

Nothing wrong with the EMS software itself, except for the very poor choice of creating it to run on a PC platform that by law is locked in time as it was a decade or so ago, and has no meaningful self-defenses in today threat environment. As I said, it wasn’t a thoughtful choice – nobody said it would be a good idea to run this really important software on something as easily hacked as anyone’s grandparent’s PC. But it was a pragmatic choice at the time, in the rush to the post-hanging-chads Federally funded voting system replacement derby. We are still stuck with the consequences.

It reminds me of that great old radio show, Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, where after stealing what seems like the greatest ship in the galaxy, the starship Heart of Gold, our heroes are stuck in space-time with Eddie Your Ship-Board Computer, “ready to get a bundle of kicks from any program you care to run through me.” The problem, of course, is that while designed to do an improbably large number of useful things, it’s not able to do one very important thing: steer the ship after being asked to run a program to learn why tea tastes good.

Election management systems, voting machines, and other parts of a voting system, all have an individual very important job to do, and should not be able to do anything else. It’s not hard to build systems that way, but that’s not what’s available from today’s 3 vendors in the for-profit market for voting systems, and services to operate them to assist elections officials. We can fix that, and we are.

But it’s the election officials, many many of them public servants with a heart of gold, that should really be highlighted. They are making do with what they have, with enormous extra effort to protect these vulnerable systems, and run an election that we all can trust. They deserve better, we all deserve better, election technology that’s built for elections that are Verifiable, Accurate, Secure, and Transparent (VAST as we like to say). The “better” is in the works, here at OSET Institute and elsewhere, but there is one more key point.

Don’t be demoralized by the fear uncertainty and doubt about hacking elections. Vote. These hardworking public servants are running the election for each of us, doing their best with what they have. Make it worth something. Vote, and believe what is true, that you are an essential part of the process that makes our democracy to be truly a democracy.

— John Sebes

PCEA Report Finally Out: The Real Opportunity for Innovation Inside

PCEACoverThis week the PCEA finally released its long-awaited report to the President.  Its loaded with good recommendations.  Over the next several days or posts we’ll give you our take on some of them.  For the moment, we want to call your attention to a couple of under-pinning elements now that its done.

The Resource Behind the Resources

Early in the formation of what initially was referred to as the “Bauer-Ginsberg Commission” we were asked to visit the co-chairs in Washington D.C. to chat about technology experts and resources.  We have a Board member who knows them both and when asked we were honored to respond.

Early on we advised the Co-Chairs that their research would be incomplete without speaking with several election technology experts, and of course they agreed.  The question was how to create a means to do so and not bog down the progress governed by layers of necessary administrative regulations.

I take a paragraph here to observe that I was very impressed in our initial meeting with Bob Bauer and Ben Ginsberg.  Despite being polar political opposites they demonstrated how Washington should work: they were respectful, collegial, sought compromise to advance the common agenda and seemed to be intent on checking politics at the door in order to get work done.  It was refreshing and restored my faith that somewhere in the District there remains a potential for government to actually work for the people.  I digress.

We advised them that looking to the CalTech-MIT Voting Project would definitely be one resource they could benefit from having.

We offered our own organization, but with our tax exempt status still pending, it would be difficult politically and otherwise to rely on us much in a visible manner.

So the Chairs asked us if we could pull together a list — not an official subcommittee mind you, but a list of the top “go to” minds in the elections technology domain.  We agreed and began a several week process of vetting a list that needed to be winnowed down to about 20 for manageability  These experts would be brought in individually as desired, or collectively  — it was to be figured out later which would be most administratively expedient.  Several of our readers, supporters, and those who know us were aware of this confidential effort.  The challenge was lack of time to run the entire process of public recruiting and selection.  So, they asked us to help expedite that, having determined we could gather the best in short order.

And that was fine because anyone was entitled to contact the Commission, submit letters and comments and come testify or speak at the several public hearings to be held.

So we did that.  And several of that group were in fact utilized.  Not everyone though, and that was kind of disappointing, but a function of the timing constraints.

The next major resource we advised they had to include besides CalTech-MIT and a tech advisory group was Rock The Vote.  And that was because (notwithstanding they being a technology partner of ours) Rock The Vote has its ear to the rails of new and young voters starting with their registration experience and initial opportunity to cast their ballot.

Finally we noted that there were a couple of other resources they really could not afford to over-look including the Verified Voting Foundation, and L.A. County’s VSAP Project and Travis County’s StarVote Project.

The outcome of all of that brings me to the meat of this post about the PCEA Report and our real contribution.  Sure, we had some behind the scenes involvement as I describe above.  No big deal.  We hope it helped.

The Real Opportunity for Innovation

But the real opportunity to contribute came in the creation of the PCEA Web Site and its resource toolkit pages.

On that site, the PCEA took our advice and chose to utilize Rock The Vote’s open source voter registration tools and specifically the foundational elements the TrustTheVote Project has built for a States’ Voter Information Services Portal.

Together, Rock The Vote and the TrustTheVote Project are able to showcase the open source software that any State can adopt, adapt, and deploy–for free (at least the adoption part) and without having to reinvent the wheel by paying for a ground-up custom build of their own online voter registration and information services portal.

We submit that this resource on their PCEA web site represents an important ingredient to injecting innovation into a stagnant technology environment of today’s elections and voting systems world.

For the first time, there is production-ready open source software available for an important part of an elections official’s administrative responsibilities that can lower costs, accelerate deployment and catalyze innovation.

To be sure, its only a start — its lower hanging fruit of an election technology platform that doesn’t require any sort of certification. With our exempt status in place, and lots of things happening we’ll soon share, there is more, much more, to come.  But this is a start.

There is a 112 pages of goodness in the PCEA report.  And there are some elements in there that deserve further discussion.  But we humbly assert its the availability of some open source software on their resource web site that we think represents a quiet breakthrough in elections technology innovation.

The news has been considerable.  So, yep, we admit it.  We’re oozing pride today.
And we owe it to your continued support of our cause.
Thank you!

GAM | out

Poster and Slides from OSDV at NIST Workshop on Common Data Format Standards

Many thanks to the engaged audience for OSDVer Anne O’Flaherty’s presentation yesterday at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), which hosted a workshop on Common Data Formats (CDFs) and standards for data interchange of election data.

We had plenty to say, based on our 2012 work with Virginia State Board of Elections (SBE), because that collaboration depends critically on CDFs. Anne and colleagues did a rather surprising amount of data wrangling over many weeks to get things all hooked up right, and the lessons learned are important for continuing work in the standards body, both NIST and the IEEE group working on CDF standards.

As requested by the attendees, here are online versions of the poster and the slides for the presentation “Bringing Transparency to Voter Registration and Absentee Voting.”

BringingTransparencyToVoterRegistrationAndAbsenteeVotingNISTfeb2012

Download Slides

OSDV_Poster_NIST_Feb_2013

View Full-Size Poster

Long Lines to Vote: Progressive, Conservative, Net-head, Bell-head

I hate to see news outlets casting in a partisan political view the issues of voter registration and ready access to the voting booth. But don’t give up on the NYT article Waiting Times at Ballot Boxes Draw Scrutiny despite its partisan lead sentence. I rarely do political commentary, but I’ll to a little today, specifically in the context of this article, which is very revealing about a traditional — and I think healthy — polarity of the American political tradition.

One side of the polarity sees issues like this not a problem per se, but a defect in the implementation of current rules. You might call this a “conservative” side of American political problem solving — don’t change the rules, but do act to improve the way that they’re put into practice. In this case, for this view, the issue of long lines at polling places is an issue of capacity that’s “very easily handled” as NYT quoted Sen. Grassley. The implied solution is more and smaller precincts, more polling places, more voting stations in the polling places, and faster procedures for voter check-in. (I should add that in the latter case, there are tech solutions, like our DIY voter check-in via the Voter Portal we did in 2012, or the Digital Pollbook project of this year.)

That really comes down to pumping more money into existing election operations.

The other side of the polarity, which you might call “progressive“, sees issues like this as a problem that needs a solution by changing the current rules, which currently define a system that’s not working. Further, the progressive sees such rule changes as an inherent part of a process of evolution of rules (a progression). In this case, for this view, traditional polling place operations are inherently flawed in practice; empirically, we have seen that it leads to hot spots where people wait a long time to check in to vote. The implied solution approach is to create or promote more changes in the voting processes — early voting, voting centers, more absentee voting, approaches to absentee voting that don’t depend on the USPS, separation of Federal elections form those messy local elections with mile-long ballots, … lots of ideas. (And some of them are partly technologically enabled!)

That really comes down to coming up with potentially a lot of money to run new programs to use these new voting methods.

I’m a conservative by temperament: don’t fix it unless you’re sure it’s broken, try some incremental tweaks before replacing it, keep it simple, every change brings in a host of unintended side effects, better the devil you know, and so on. But I like both of these approaches, because they both have a common factor — increased Federal spending on Federal elections. Believe me the local election officials need it!

Lastly, there’s also a tech analogy in the nethead vs. bellhead polarity. Netheads see problems not as structural but in terms of capacity and scale; if your network isn’t working right, throw in some more network capacity and compute capacity, but conserve the simplicity of the current structure. Bellheads want to implement  progressively more careful control systems. It’s a long story about how we now have both in a sort of wave/particle duality, but for this political issue, the geek approach of “both!”, is really easy to say: Throw lots more resources at the long lines problem in the current system (line up to vote in person in one specific place on election day), while at the same time doing more with alternative methods; see what happens, and use the results to drive better application of more resources where that has a positive effect, and also use the results to drive more progress in tuning the new approaches (alternate voting methods) in parallel to the existing system with its preserved simplicity. I rarely expect the political process to be informed by the geek view, but there it is.

So, in regard to this supposed political tussle coming, I say: “I hope you both win!”

— EJS

TrustTheVote’s Next Steps in Online Voter Registration Technology

In this New Year, there are so many new opportunties for election tech work that our collective TrustTheVote head is spinning. But this week anyway, we’re focused on next steps in our online voter registration (OVR) work — planning sessions last week, meetings with state election officials this week, and I hope as a result, a specific plan of action on what we call will “Rocky 4”.

To refresh readers’ memory, Rocky is the OVR system that spans several organizations:

  • At OSDV, we developed and maintain the Rocky core software;
  • RockTheVote adopted and continues to adopt extensions to it;
  • RockTheVote also adapts the Rocky technology to its operational environment (more on that below, with private-label and API);
  • Open Source Labs operates Rocky’s production system, and a build and test environment for new software releases;
  • Several NGOs that are RockTheVote partners also use Rocky as their own OVR system, essentially working with RTV as a public service (no fees!) provider of OVR as an open-source application-as-a-service;
  • For a growing list of states that do OVR, Rocky integrates with the state OVR system, to deliver to it the users that RTV and these various other NGOs have connected to online a a result of outreach efforts.

With that recap in mind, I want to highlight some of the accomplishments that this collective of organizations achieved in 2012, and paved the way for more cool stuff in 2013.

  • All told, this group effort resulted in over a million — 1,058,994 — voter registration applications completed.
  • Dozens of partner organizations used Rocky to register their constituents, with the largest and most active being Long Distance Voter.
  • We launched a private-label capability in Rocky (more below) that was used for the first time this summer, and the top 3 out of 10 private-label partners registered about 84,000 voters in the first-time use of this new Rocky feature, in a period of about 12 weeks.
  • We launched an API in Rocky (more below), and the early adopter organizations registered about 20,000 voters.

That’s what I call solid work, with innovative election technology delivering substantial public benefit.

Lastly, to set the stage for upcoming news about what 2013 holds, let me briefly explain 2 of the new technologies in 2012, because they’re the basis for work in 2013. Now, from the very beginning of Rocky over 3 years ago, there was a feature called “partner support” where a a 3rd party organization could do a little co-branding in the Rocky application, get a URL that they could use to direct their users to Rocky (where the users would see the 3rd party org’s logo), and all the resulting registration activity’s stats would be available to the 3rd party org.

The Rocky API –   But suppose that you’re in an organization that has not just its own web site, but  a substantial in-house web application? Suppose that you want your web application to do the user interaction (UI)? Well, the Rocky Application Programming Interface (API) is for just that. Your application do all the UI stuff, and when it’s time to create a PDF for the voter to download, print, sign, and mail, your web app calls the Rocky API to request that, and get the results back. (There’s an analogous workflow for integrating the state OVR systems for paperless online registration.) The Rocky backend does all the database work, PDF generation, state integration, stats, reporting, and the API also allows you to pull back stats if you don’t want to manually use the Partners’ web interface of Rocky.

Rocky Private Label –  But suppose instead that you want something like that, but you don’t actually want to run your own web application. Instead, you want a version of Rocky that’s customized to look like a web property of your organization, even though it is operated by RockTheVote. That’s what the private-label feature set is for. To get an idea of what it looks like, check out University of CA Student Association’s private-label UI on Rocky, here.

That’s the quick run-down on what we accomplished with Rocky in 2012, and some of the enabling technology for that. I didn’t talk much about integration with state OVR systems, because enhancements to the 2012 “training wheels” is part of what we’re up to now — so more on that to come RSN.

And on behalf of all my colleagues in the TrustTheVote Project and at the OSDV Foundation, I want to thank RockTheVote, Open Source Labs, all the RTV partners, and last but not least several staff at state election offices, for making 2012 a very productive year in the OVR part of OSDV’s work.

— EJS

NYT: Smartphone Voting? TrustTheVote: No, But How About This … DIY Voter Lookup

Much as I admire everybody at the New York Times, I have to disagree with Nick Bilton on his piece Disruptions: Casting a Ballot by Smartphone. I have to say I don’t blame him though, especially given the broad range of coverage of the many many kinds election dysfunction that occured and are still occuring now during state canvassing. Just to take a few examples:

But even leaving aside the plethora of discouraging news on election technology, I can also see why Bilton would find it ironic to look at all those long lines of people waiting to vote, and in the meantime using their smart phones to do an enormous range of important things – you’ve just got think

Can’t those smart phones do something useful with all this election mess?

My answer is a resounding “YES!!!” — but not for Internet voting. I won’t bore longtime readers with the details of why Bilton’s comparison with Estonian i-voting is not apt (you can read it in back issues here, or in comments posted on Bilton’s blog). But something else that works right now — and which we helped build — really would work to cut down those long lines a bit, at least in Virginia, plus other states that can freely adopt the open source system. (If you want details on how that works, just ask!)

Here is the situation … Think about all those voters who waited in line for a long time, only to find out that they were in the wrong polling place, or were listed (sometimes incorrectly) as an absentee voter not eligible to vote in person, or … any number of reasons why people had to vote provisionally this year in unusually large numbers. Part of that phenom was (I guess) just that after waiting hours in line, people just said, dang it, I am going to vote here and now, even provisionally, rather than spend more time trying figure out what’s going on.

Who can blame them? Now, I hear some of the experts saying that fancy new e-pollbooks could help, with poll workers working the line before people get to the front, in order to look them up and identify any issues earlier. Good idea! And indeed, low-cost tablet-based e-pollbooks are part of TrustTheVote’s plan for election tech build-out. But with an 8 hour long line, and maybe a couple poll workers not needed inside to polling place, that’s not going to go far. We can go one better.

Here how it works … If you arrived at polling place to find a long line, and a stream of people coming out complaining that they were weren’t on the voting rolls, you could have whipped out your smart phone, gone to https://www.vote.virginia.gov/search (powered by OSDV!), entered your voter ID info, and determined whether you were in the right place, and whether your were eligible to vote. Heck, you could have done that days before the election, and maybe found out that you did have a voter records issue, and how to deal with it, even before getting in any line. When you’ve got a handful of poll-workers and many hundreds of people waiting, do-it-yourself voter lookup works a lot better.

Of course, the new Virginia Voter Services Portal is just getting started, with more features going live for the January elections, and we hope even more after that — including mobile-centric features. If you have a idea for that, please share it with us!

— EJS

Election Tech “R” Us – and Interesting Related IP News

Good Evening–

On this election night, I can’t resist pointing out the irony of the USPTO’s news of the day for Election Day earlier: “Patenting Your Vote,” a nice little article about patents on voting technology.  It’s also a nice complement to our recent posting on the other form of intellectual property protection on election technology — trade secrets.  In fact, there is some interesting news of the day about how intellectual property protections won’t (as some feared) inhibit the use of election technology in Florida.

For recent readers, let’s be clear again about what election technology is, and our mission. Election technology is any form of computing — “software ‘n’ stuff” — used by election officials to carry out their administrative duties (like voter registration databases), or by voters to cast a ballot (like an opscan machine for recording votes off of a paper ballot), or by election officials to prepare for an election (like defining ballots), or to conduct an election (like scanning absentee ballots), or to inform the public (like election results reporting). That covers a lot of ground for “election technology.”

With the definition, it’s reasonable to say that “Election Technology ‘R’ Us” is what the TrustTheVote Project is about, and why the OSDV Foundation exists to support it.  And about intellectual property protection?   I think we’re clear on the pros and cons:

  • CON: trade secrets and software licenses that protect them. These create “black box” for-profit election technology that seems to decrease rather than increase public confidence.
  • PRO: open source software licenses. These enable government organizations to [A] adopt election technology with a well-defined legal framework, without which the adoption cannot happen; and [B] enjoy the fruits of the perpetual harvest made possible by virtue of open source efforts.
  • PRO: patent applications on election technology.  As in today’s news, the USPTO can make clear which aspects of voting technology can or can’t be protected with patents that could inhibit election officials from using the technology, or require them to pay licensing fees.
  • ZERO SUM: granted patents on techniques or business processes (used in election administration or the conduct of elections) in favor of for-profit companies.  Downside: can increase costs of election technology adoption by governments. Upside: if the companies do have something innovative, they are entitled to I.P. protection, and it may motivate investment in innovation.  Downside: we haven’t actually seen much innovation by voting system product vendors, or contract software development organizations used by election administration organizations.
  • PRO: granted patents to non-profit organizations.  To the extent that there are innovations that non-profits come up with, patents can be used to protect the innovations so that for-profits can’t nab the I.P., and charge license fees back to governments running open source software that embodies the innovations.

All that stated, the practical upshot as of today seems to be this: there isn’t much innovation in election technology, and that may be why for-profits try to use trade secret protection rather than patents.

That underscores our practical view at the TrustTheVote Project: a lot of election technology isn’t actually hard, but rather simply detailed and burdensome to get right — a burden beyond the scope of all but a few do-it-ourself elections offices’ I.T. groups.

That’s why our “Election Technology ‘R’ Us” role is to understand what the real election officials actually need, and then to (please pardon me) “Git ‘er done.”

What we’re “getting done” is the derivation of blue prints and reference implementations of an elections technology framework that can be adopted, adapted, and deployed by any jurisdiction with common open data formats, processes, and verification and accountability loops designed-in from the get-go.  This derivation is based on the collective input of elections experts nationwide, from every jurisdiction and every political process point of view.  And the real beauty: whereas no single jurisdiction could possibly ever afford (in terms of resources, time or money) to achieve this on their own, by virtue of the collective effort, they can because everyone benefits — not just from the initial outcomes, but from the on-going improvements and innovations contributed by all.

We believe (and so do the many who support this effort) that the public benefit is obvious and enormous: from every citizen who deserve their ballots counted as cast, to every local election official who must have an elections management service layer with complete fault tolerance in a transparent, secure, and verifiable manner.

From what we’ve been told, this certainly lifts a load of responsibility off the shoulders of elections officials and allows it to be more comfortably distributed.  But what’s more, regardless of how our efforts may lighten their burden, the enlightenment that comes from this clearinghouse effect is of enormous benefit to everyone by itself.

So, at the end of the day, what we all benefit from is a way forward for publicly owned critical democracy infrastructure.  That is, that “thing” in our process of democracy that causes long lines and insecurities, which the President noted we need to fix during his victory speech tonight.  Sure, its about a lot of process.  But where there will inevitably be technology involved, well that would be the TrustTheVote Project.

GAM|out